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to tokyo to tell her story. she uses her experience in the vietnam war in her campaign for peace. >>> welcome to nhk world "newsline." u.s. and south korean troops have been carrying out exercises after exercise since the beginning of last month to prepare for any future conflict. the annual drills have angered north korea. now the media are getting an inside look at the operation which is called "full eagle." the troops showed part of an exercise to journalists in the southeastern city of qohang. about 2,000 personnel unloaded military supplies for ground combat troops from ships anchored nearby. they're preparing for the possibility that an enemy attack would destroy ports. the u.s. and south korea plan to continue to do the annual drills until the end of this month. north korean leaders said last week they would agree to dialogue with the countries if they suspended the drills. south korean officials are still concerned about a possible missile launch by pyongyang. >> translator: north korea doesn't appear to have removed its ballistic missiles from the sea of japan coast. >>
of casualties in afghanistan is not only smaller than iraq, but it's much smaller than vietnam or korea or world war i or world war ii. and as a practical matter, the serious fighting has only gone on for the last four or five years. we did another study at rand which looked at what are the prospects for winning a counterinsurgency, and there are a number of elements that have to be in place to give you a reasonable prospect of winning a counterinsurgency campaign. once you have all of those elements in place, which are not just resource elements, they're also policy elements, dock -- dock tribal elements, it usually takes seven years for them to actually turn the tide and begin to definitively defeat the enemy. well, i don't think anybody would argue we had those elements in place anytime before 2009, 2010 in afghanistan. so i think one as to put in some perspective the concern that this is the longest war we've ever fought, and we're getting tired of it, and we have to leave. nevertheless, i think things have gone wrong. i don't disagree with many of the more tactical points that raj made abou
on the needs and challenges facing veterans returning from war. linda is a former vietnam era air force fighter and veterans activist. she heads the connecticut veteran affairs department. this is just over one hour from duke university. >> good afternoon. welcome to the 50th presentation of the duke university school of nursing event. in 1968, it became officially known as the harriet cook carter lecture. i'm dean of the school of nursing. i'm pleased to welcome all of you here today on behalf of our duke university school of nursing community. as indicated in your program, this lecture is named in honor of harriet cook carter , a compassionate and creative woman who endears herself to localiversity and the community through community activities. this year's topic holds a special place in the hearts and minds of our community. many of you are veterans of military service or are engaged in the care of our veterans. may i ask those who have served to stand up please. [applause] anil those of you who have cared for at the service or veterans -- and those of you who have cared for active service
to pay tribute to the fallen victims of the vietnam war. april is autism awareness month and big corporations are joining forces for the good of the cause. update news starts now. hello and welcome to update news... im pedro garcia. and i'm elizabeth olveda... thanks for joining us. students dress a number of ways on the san jose state campus...but for some women what they wear is not just fashion...but a cultural statement. update news reporter carla jimenez is live on campus. the viewing of a different type of documentary was presented this week in the dr. king library. "just a piece of cloth," was directed by sjsu professor rosemary henze. it concentrates on the topic of muslim women who chose to wear, or not to wear a veil, also known as the hijab. ">>>the documentary is based on four different muslim women, with very diffefrent beliefs of why they choose to wear or not to wear the hijab. the two guest during the viewing were arwa abushariefeh originally from jordan and mahsa modirhazadeh orignially from iran. both women answered questions from the audience regarding their cu
of her life that is one of the endearing memories of the vietnam war. >> that day changed my life forever. >> reporter: it was june 8th, 197 2. kim was 9 years old, naked and running down a road in southern vietnam. she'd been burned by napalm bombs. >> my clothes were burned off. and my skin was on fire. and someone began screaming, too hot! too hot! >> reporter: the associated press picture captured worldwide attention. some say it helped end the vietnam war. the bombing and the photograph changed kim's life. >> the officer would come and pick me up from my school to do a lot of interviews with the foreign press. >> reporter: after the war, the communist government used her as part of its campaign to paint the u.s. and south vietnam forces as cruel. kim says she felt like a bird in a cage. so she escaped, defecting to canada in 1992 with her husband. four years later she traveled to washington, d.c. to attend a ceremony commemorating the vietnam war. she says she forgave the u.s. veteran who ordered the bombing that left her badly injured and killed some ofer relatives. with conflicts g
smaller than iraq, but much smaller than vietnam or korea or world war i or two. as a practical matter, the serious fighting is only gone on for the last 4-5 years. you did another study looking at the prospects of winning a counterinsurgency. there are a number of elements that have to be in place to give you a reasonable prospect. thoseou have all of elements in place, which are not just resource elements, it usually takes about seven years for them to actually turn the tide and begin to definitively defeat the enemy. i don't think anybody would argue we have those almonds in place before 2009-2010 in afghanistan. you have to put in some perspective that this was the longest war. we are getting tired and we have to leave. things have gone wrong. i don't disagree with the more tactical points that he made about deficiencies in the surge. staythink we need to committed in afghanistan. we are going to be committed at much lower levels of manpower and money. i think the intent is to have reduced the force to something like 8000-15,000. the more lower level being more likely. think a cont
't go to war in vietnam we know the terrain there were french colony before this will end badly you'll be seen as a western arm evacuation you will sink step by step into a quagmire and predicted it would last 10 years as will be bad for the west so relaunched of boycott of french goods and french flags and a member of congress gave a speech to say we should begin for boys from normandy because it is no longer a fit place and we said he is the anti-american with the war against in vietnam and in each case we ignored for an opinion and the problem is we marched off to the tune foreign policy debacles there is a problem there. the secretary of defense to orchestrated the escalation of the 30 years later spoke of his regret we could count listen that it was a failure of the imagination to realize if french were the best informed westerners and we deny take them seriously because we assumed they had in for us. as the book recounts i went to their records and the french archives and what the advisers were telling him and they were not saying those americans had no coulter but what they s
people. if vietnam is the lesson for leaving the local people, we leave any people would support, will be before we showed. bush had a terrible time with the democrats saying you have to get out, you have to get out. and in a sense, how can you negotiate with the taliban if he tell them you are leaving in 2014, when the only thing they care about is when i you going to leave. so if you going to get the support of the local people, we cannot set a deadline to leave, but if we don't set a deadline to leave, how we take care of the american people? it goes back again to vietnam and the minister in williamsburg who asked lyndon johnson, tell me, what are we there? is it not there for a requirement to not only get the support of the local people, we have to explain to the american people better the job of why we are there in order not to give them a deadline to get out. but the deadline to get out, seems to me, has been one of our biggest mistakes. >> so the deadline and also speaking to two audiences. >> i don't comment on a couple of those things. compared to vietnam, at least in a
of a dark period in their recent history. patchari raksawong is following this. >> people in vietnam know the deadly and damaging impact of bird flu so government officials are taking no chances. nhk world's ichihara in hanoi show us how they're staying on guard. in the wednesday evening news, the country put vietnam on high alert. as a measure, the ministry of agricultural and rural development expand import of birds and poultry from china. customs officials, police, and other authorities are working together to strength then controls along the border with china. vietnam has bitter memories of deadly outbreaks of avian flu. in 2004 the h5n1 strain spread across the country. 40 million chickens suspected of infection were killed. authorities also imposed an out right ban on moving or selling chickens. the epidemic not only effected the domestic economy and people's daily lives, it also led to a decline in the number of tourists. tourism is a key source of currency revenue for vietnam. state-run television is broadcasting the results of the government crackdown. on thursday, they reported
of cable. >> bill: the o'reilly factor is on. >> what do you think about what happened to the 3,000 vietnam mees who died after the cam bodians left vietnam. >> actress jane fonda is back. this time playing nancy regan in an upcoming film. the vietnam vets are outraged. fonda is responding with new incults. did the thoughtless thespian go too far? we'll have the story. freedom of speech being muzzled on campus and in the press. why is the left wing trying to silence those with whom they disapee. karl rove will be here to respond. if i let him. ♪ and jay z. defends his recent trip to communist cuba with a new song, if you can call it that ♪ obama said kill you going to get me impeached, you don't need this [ bleep ] anyway, chill with me on the beach ♪ >> greg: did president obama really give them the nod? we will get to the bottom of the controversy if there is one. caution, you are are about to enter the no spin zone. "the factor" begins right now. >> greg: i'm greg gutfeld in for bill o'reilly. jane fonda telling veterans and other critics threatening to boycott the new movie to "ge
, not boxing, but his refusal to fight in vietnam. the years of exile that followed and the supreme court's reversal of his conviction for resisting the draft. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. u.s. officials say intelligence indicates the regime of syrian president bashar al-assad has used deadly chemical weapons in its conflict with rebel fighters. the announcement raises the prospect of more direct u.s. intervention in syria since president obama has referred to the use of such weapons as a game changer. but the white house says the current information is not conclusive enough to spur action. defense secretary chuck hagel described the findings thursday. >> u.s. intelligence community assesses with some degree of during confidence the syrian regime has used chemical weapons on a small scale in syria. specifically, the chemical agent sarin. we still have some uncertainties about what was used, what kind of chemical was used -- who was using it. >> chuck hagel's remarks came a day after he agree but simi
, vietnam, malaysia, mexico, canada, all have joined in the negotiations. and we continue to welcome other countries. the interest of other countries. including japan. that was a source of discussion when the prime minister was here several weeks ago. our goal is for high standards for the transpacific partnership to enter the bloodstream of the global system and improve the rules and norms. and by the way, it ends up affecting conduct in those countries as well. as the president and others, the transpacific partnership leaders have clearly stated we intend to conclude the negotiations this year. our economic engagement with europe, by the way, is no less ambitious. we've built especially deep and robust security institutions that span the atlantic. and now it's time for that economic cooperation to catch up and -- and sink deeper roots. because the truth is, the united states and the european union are each other's most important trading partners. and will remain so. the u.s. and e.u. commercial relationship today exceeds $5 trillion, far and away the world's largest. but we know, we know
get their benefits. as a veteranmind, who served during the vietnam has served me well. i want to give you some idea of what we are talking about. -- therst first statistic first -- 22 fact that we have , there living veterans .re a number of women veterans .hat this bottom graph -- sorry it israph shows you that almost a bell curve. at number of veterans different ages -- we are having an aging of my generation. contrast that with the number of women veterans. the younger veterans of today are more predominately women than in the past. when i was in the military in the air force, 2% of women by law. i could not be married or have a child. was born and i had to leave the military. but things have changed quite a bit. the tall one here is a vietnam population. you can see that number rise -- let me say something for the actuary table by the va. they've forecasted that the theyam population would -- were wrong. this should give you some idea that we see a decline of vietnam veterans a generation. vietnam was the largest mobilization after world war ii. ofn you talk about a system care an
or asked, have you ever served in the military? yes. what did you do? i was in vietnam. you need to go to the va. they will help you with your care and there might be an opportunity to help you with some compensation. when you have a long list of those diseases, and of course, the hepatitis c virus in all the things that happened with that, the debilitating disease -- i think the most difficult. ischemic heart disease. a study give us a hint. we saw that. now it is expected. did they serve in vietnam? did they have this diagnosis? and we will take care of you. forn who served in vietnam a long time, there was the suspicion that there was not a lot of data, that some of them were at risk of birth affect. -- for birth defects. they compensate the children of women who served in vietnam. if they had spina bifida or other birth defects. this is a good example of the exposure to a hazard, environmental hazard. and the effect on the offspring. we had more difficulty with providing improving the link -- and proving the link. with the men. as we learn, things change and new evidence comes to l
juggernaut. some of us reported from vietnam, recalled how thousand-year-old societies are a little suspicious of saviors with a shopping list. but it happens. so, what's wrong with us? >> good question. it's great to be here, thank you all for coming out so early on a sunday morning, and, mort, thank you for sitting here with me. we -- we're a great nation. we like to think we can good out and fix other societies. we have a lot o to offer but every spending two plus years observing our nation-building efforts in iraq, and now more recently three years traveling back and forth to afghanistan, to observe what we're doing the there and actually spending more money in afghanistan than iraq and it's the longest war our nation has ever been engaged in longer than the revolutionary war. i come away with mixed opinions about this. on one hand you look at both of these and say, what are we doing in the business of trying to build, in some case rebuild, in the case of afghanistan, build from scratch, shattered societies where there's little human capacity, very little infrastructure to speak
homenaje a los veteranos de la guerra de vietnam... take vo blanca ---ademas, miles de residentes de 3 condados de nuestra region tendran que pagar mas impuestos al hacer compras. take sot --- javier castro ===roll ticker=== topvo blanca ¡qué buen ¡vamos!concierto! fiesta! awwwww. arigato y hasta luego. vamonos! vamonos! fiesta... encontramos tu lugar perfecto a donde quiera que vas. hotels.com jose, por fin se develo el nuevo monumento que honra a los veteranos de la guerra de vietnam. ---el monumento se llama "hijos de san jose" y contienen los nombres de todos 142 soldados que nacieron en esa ciudad del sur de la bahia y que murieron durante su participaron en el conflicto blico que duro varios aÑos. ---tambien incluye el nombre de un soldado que resulto perdido en combate. ---el monumento esta ubicado sobre la calle west santa clara, cerca del hp pavilion. cesar ---"frank ryan" un bombero de san jose retorno hoy a sus labores despues de siete meses de estar convalesciente tras sufrir un ataque cardiaco cuando combatia un incendio en la catedral de san patricio... take vo ---en
awareness for an explosion situation left behind from the vietnam war. >> it's a hands on effort y it's hands off whit comes to one group's effort to remove graffiti from overpasses and street signs in a bay area city at >>> two young hempeople from the country of laos are in the bay area talking about the impact of unexploded bombs that are left over from the time of the vietnam war nearly 40 years ago. a former u.s. ambassador traveled with them. a mother leading a team of women to remove unexploded bombs she leaves her 2-year-old son when going to work. she visited stanford with retired ambassador douglas heartwick and this man who lost his left hand to a cluster bomb at just 8. >> i served as ambassador to laos in early 2000s. it remains almost equally serious today. >> i am honored to be doing this work and help was development of the country and makes me happen yes to know i can contribute to lessen dangers. >> this is to let people know how they can help laos have a safer future. >> we can make a difference. >> california reached a major milestone in the number of registered ti
feeling in july? >> growing up during the days of the vietnam war. i was a high school student. my sister is two years older than me. her boyfriend was drafted and went off to war. he was a lovely young man before he was taken off to vietnam. a couple of months after, he sent her back a present. comms an ear of a viet and it was a souvenir for her to put around her neck oh stop i was horrified that this nice young men had turned into what i considered at that time a monster. to think that some of the human ear is something that you would wear around your neck. that change me for life. it really made me feel like we toe to do everything we can stop killing each other. we have to avoid wars that are avoidable like the war in vietnam. we have to speak out on behalf -f looking for other ways, non- violent ways, to resolve conflict. >> what did your parents do? >> they were your typical, some family.burban mostly republican. they said, hey, that is the way things are. >> what kind of business were they in? >> my father was in real estate. >> and mom? >> a stay-at-home mom. >> can you remember
at riverside will become king's moral watershed over vietnam. by 1966 the u.s. was mired in a war it could not win, and blacks were the losers, measured as a percentage of adult males, blacks were dying in vietnam at a rate twice as high as whites. >> in order to atone for our sins and errors in vietnam, we should take the initiative in bringing a halt to this tragic war. >> everybody attacked him. >> what was president johnson's reaction after the riverside speech? >> well, after the riverside speech, i don't think we talked to him anymore. >> he was angry? >> yeah. >> on that day, april the 4th, 1967, as king spoke at riverside, he would have exactly one year left to live. three weeks later, while king was leading an anti-war protest in massachusetts, 1,000 miles away in missouri, a small-time criminal named james earl ray would escape from prison and start on the course that would bring both men to memphis on april 4th, 1968. >>> ahead, a life spent outside the law. >> they don't catch them all the other crimes, you know, so he done a lot of things he got away with. kate and i have been
the horrific images of vietnam. he's considered killing himself. but now he's learning to gain new perspective thrau camera lens. >> taking pictures to me is shouting out what i've dealt with. >> we'll call it a work of art. >> reporter: those suffering from ptsd and other challenges are processing their emotions in this photography class at the v.a.'s menlo park campus. veterans like ramon can explain their painful journey in poignant photos they snapped themselves. photography gives them a new focus in their recovery. the idea? that it can be easier to communicate with a camera than face to face with a therapist. v.a. nurse susan cofounded the photography class. >> some of these emotions can be so traumatic for people, that everyday language just doesn't get at the heart of what they're feeling. >> reporter: when richard finished the class, he could finally share haunting vietnam wars memories that caused years of anger and alcohol abuse. >> he said, you might as well leave my class now, because anybody that was stupid enough to go to vietnam and kill women and children doesn't deserve to pa
, the symbolism of vietnam was sending was that this was quickly, we were quickly turning into, turning toward fascism, right? and so in december of 1967, he announces the poor people's campaign in which his organization, the southern christian leadership council, i shall refer to it as the sclc, would bring, quote, waves of the poor and disinherited to washington, d.c. to demand redress of their grievances to the goth adding that the poor would stay until america responds. but he envisioned this campaign as not just black and white, but one that included mexican-americans, puerto ricans and native americans as well. and he had hoped that the campaign would do a number of things, three primary goals; transform fully the struggle of civil rights to the struggle of human rights, bring about the federal government's redeadation to the war on poverty, a war on poverty that was declared four years earlier by president lyndon johnson but never fully fought, never fully funded, and to, hopefully, restore the credibility of nonviolence in social justice organizing, right? which had lost ground conside
to be made at the state department to stand true to the courage he showed in vietnam when he spoke about bravery and seeking a true alternative that would benefit this country. i think we need to keep driving the importance of making change that will allow this planet and country to survive. what is stunning is we have come out of hurricane katrina years ago, now hurricane sandy in my city and this area, we're looking at arctic melting in ways we have never seen, the science is so clear. there are good decisions being made. in general, this is where the fossil fuel industry has a great grip on our politics and economy. we have got to unshackle that grip. host: let's get one more call. go ahead, jim. caller: i would like to the comment on the topic you started the sector with. in the private sector, there is competition. when certain business models failed to be competitive, collective bargaining gave us a lot of good. the public sector compared to the private sector, even if it is a vital service or product, there is not competition. the collective bargaining, i am not sure about it. i b
house fellow. during the vietnam war, he was shot down by ground fire, seriously injured. he was captured while trying to evade and spent over six-and-a-half years as a p.o.w. in hanoi. after a long career in the air force, he now occupies leadership positions in business organizations including symphonics and assent explo nation. he's also been the president and ceo of chicago's united way and is also the founder of sos america, service over self, advocating military service for america's young men. a motivational, political, business and philosophy speaker, he is in demand. we're lucky of to have him with us to speak on his latest book, "taps on the wall." please offer up a warm welcome to major general john borling. [applause] >> well, thanks. that was a pretty good introduction. you squirming on your chairs yet, wondering is this guy going to be any damn good or not, right? [laughter] we're going to do something a little different cranking up, and thank you all so much for coming. you had a flight line as you with walked in, and those were the patriot writers of washingto
a group of vietnam vets to get a life, that's a quote, after they protested her upcoming role in a film. today we'll speak live with the man organizing this effort and he's got a bit of a response to ms. fonda. you'll hear it here live. and in kelly's court, a bevy of beauticians and a multi-million dollar lotto win. can the employ hewho's accused of styling herself as the stole winner, prove, prove that the winning ticket was in fact not one she ever meant to split with her co-workers? she has a pretty amazing defense we didn't know about when we first did kelly's court on this. so ground two takes place today. ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you measure happiness? by the armful? by the barrelful? e carful? how about...by the bowlful? campbell's soups give you nutrition, energy, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. [ female announcer ] from meeting customer needs... to meeting patient needs... ♪ wireless is limitless. ♪ from finding the best way... ♪ to finding the best catch... ♪ wireless is limitless. >> a troubling new development
. new mexico and a baby saved from certain death and war torn vietnam. meets her hero, more than 40 years later. kimberly mitchell was born in vietnam in 1971, a soldier fighting for the south vietnamese army found her in her dead mother's arms and named the child and managed to get her to an orphanage. they're finally meeting decades later in albuquerque. >> mitchell grew up in the u.s. the soldier, known as mr. bow, came hacross her name in a story hoping to learn more about her family. >> i hope i'll be able to go back to vietnam with mr. bow and visit the place. >> and that's a fox watch across america. one state wants bigger bottles of beer. at least one group is trying to stop it from happening and baseball is back. oh. a new year beginning. new changes, new ways declared. and find out how some teams scout their talent, adam housley, a co-worker who played a little bit of ball, i understand. >> and just a little bit of college hoops this, one just wrapping up. a tough defensive matchup between two of the best teams, louisville, a first seed, and duke. the game was close early
at first. until i started hearing from vietnam era marines, korean war navy corpsmen, nurses marks recents even from world war ii, two told me that the list made them remember, and that remembering was okay. and then i was humbled. i thought i would share the poem as it is truly the beginning of my story, and it appears many others as well. things that were good. sunsets over the desert. almost always orange. sunrise over the desert. almost always red. a child-like excitement of having fresh fruit at dipper after going months without it. being allowed to be the kind of clinician i know i can be and want to be. with no limits placed and no doubts expressed. but most of all, the united states marines, our patients, walking every day and having every single person who passed by me say, hura, mam, and having one half them ask me, when can i get out of sneer i just want to get back to my unit. meeting a young sergeant who lost an eye in an explosion, he asked a surgeon if he could open the other one. when he did he sat up and looked at the marines from his team being treat net the other room. h
you know, one can travel relatively inexpensively in places like vietnam. you will not be living luxuriously but look, i'm not going to tell you drop out of school and start traveling. but you might consider it. >> we've got a clip to play here. this is from a friend of yours. he's got a few things to say about you, mr. bourdain. >> anthony, when i was in peru with you shooting "parts unknown" for cnn, i noticed that suddenly we have a car just for the talent and everybody else is cramped in those tiny cars with no air conditioning, and i'm thinking wow, this is a promotion. then i realized you sleep a lot and you probably don't know that, but you snore, you drool on my shoulder and because you eat so much, you have some kind of flatulence. so now i got it. i know why they don't want to be in your car. >> wow. talk about killing your brand. >> last time i eat at his restaurant. >> all chefs i have ever met, anyone in the culinary business, all incrediby competitive. you would all basically trample over each other. >> no, less so -- in england, that's true. merciless. cut each oth
vietnam exhibit. now if you go today, you see a much more honest portrayal of vietnam and the nation divided. i think if we go to the bush library, my guess is 50 years from now it will be a somewhat different set of exhibits about the wars. >> but it is important, wayne, because, for example, george bush raised more money for the bush library than he raised for the 2000 and 2004 campaigns. he raised $500 million plus for the library. more than both of the elections. so the presidents' legacies and how they want to be remembered is extremely important to them. >> you bet you. and that's one of the things bush always talks about. when he was -- the last months of his administration, and frankly the four years, the few times we've talked to him or he's talked publicly, he's always expressed the idea that he doesn't care. that it's not important to him. the fact is just the opposite. if you look at our interview with bush which we published last week, bush said things like, you know, nobody likes to be criticized all the time. when we raised issues, tom benning of our staff raised issue
different ways in did not handle the attention gracefully at first until i started hearing from vietnam-era marines, carry it -- marines even from world war ii middle me that the list made them remember and that remember it was apparent and then i was humbled. i thought i would share the poem, as it is truly the beginning of my story and it appears many others as well. things that were good. sunset over the desert, almost always orange. sunrise over the desert, almost always read. a childlike excitement of having fresh fruit at dinner after going months without a. being allowed to be the kind of condition i know i can be and what to be with no limits placed most of all faugh, the united states marines, our patients what they every day and having every single person who passed by me say who rock, ma'am. having them tell me one after another through blinding pain or morphine induced euphoria, when can i get out of here? add just want to get back to my unit. mediate sergeant who lost an eye . he as the surgeon if he could open the other one. elected the marines, smiled to lay back down and
in vietnam know the deadly and damaging impact of the virus. so government officials there are taking no chances. >>> it was chiefs in japan are trying to figure out what authorities will do next. intelligence reports the north korean military have moved a medium range ballistic missile to launch site. they are considering calling on the north to refrain from any further provocations. they will meet next wednesday and thursday in london. they are expected to confirm their governments will implement a corporation that include stronger sanctions against the country. they may release a chairperson statement warning north korea it will further isolate itself by making any new provocations. the statement would also call on authorities to take concrete steps to resolve the situation. north korean leaders have threatened a nuclear strike on american targets and said they are in state of war with south korea. cabinet ministers in japan meet on friday to improve new measures. they are expected to add two years to a ban on north korea ships entering japanese ports. the government plans to freez
a general in the vietnam war. it is problematic, as are most of the pictures in this book. this is a picture in which the general was shooting a suspected viet cong prisoner. and the picture came out and it was widely, widely admired, widely recognized. intensely generated discomfort for ed robbins. the argument was that taking the one picture, the other pictures created something that gave him notoriety, made it difficult for him to live a so-called normal life after the fact. the argument is that these pictures, because they are very important in capturing the moment, there are tensions of what they actually depict. >> host: professor barbie zelizer, talking about public policy issue that we have been facing last couple of years. fallen soldiers, dead u.s. soldiers. should those images be shown? >> guest: i think that those images should be shown. when someone is facing death, it has become so prevalent. across the landscape of events about which they are concerned. the reason this has arisen with such widespread use is because of pictures of death. i think that is something that we need t
christians has been in prison for about seven years. father lee in vietnam. there are just so many others. thank you. >> i would second that and add to my earlier comments, two related things. one is mainly stressed the negative things which are happening. the book also seeks to be encouraging and enlightening, inspiring hope. because many of these stories involve suffering. but they also involve victory unfaithfulness, and those are very inspiring. and in my comments, want to make a great deal of difference on these issues if we work hard and we are focused. >> i totally agree. and i also think it's important to remember that we can all make noise of some kind about these things. we can write to the editor of the paper, we can publish small editorials to our local press. we can ask for prayer and our churches. keep it in front of people. keep people aware of it. it's up to us to really do know about it, to communicate to people that are less informed. i've been speaking about another book that i've written, and i've spoken a lot to jewish audiences, and they are very shocked that christi
they dedicated a memorial vietnam veterans. i would like to know visiting hours of the academy. me and my wife would like to come visit. keep up the good work and sober for dallas, brother. -- simper fidelis. guest: it is open to the public. this is a significant tourist destination. we are a college, we are a naval academy, and we are also a very popular place for people to come and see the great work that we're doing here. we have guided tours, nearly every day, all day, full-scale visitors. we have an unbelievable museum where you can look in the history of the navy and marine corps here. host: as we look at the midshipmen in uniform, is a required for every class? is there a casual friday? guest: no, there is no casual friday. when the midshipmen get leave opportunities, they put their civilian clothes on and head home or wherever they're going to go on leave. we provide the usual attire for them. they will all be in uniform while they're here. attending students the academy over four years. there are 24 academic majors, over 500 faculty members. the ratio of faculty member to student is b
vietnam received a gift of life today. he was diagnosed with a rare blood disease. today he received a transplant during a 4 hour procedures. the donor, his own brother flew to california from vietnam to save his brother's life. >> most people aren't this lucky. takes a long time to find a match so we are lucky and thankful. >> this is a story only on 2. ktvu's janet will have more tonight on the 10:00 p.m. news. >> fantastic. >>> our weather now. bill, this has been one of the best weeks in a long time. >> and it will continue that way as we go into the bay area weekend. temperatures on the increase. nice spring-like weather that you will like. it is not going to rain. no rain in the forecast. jet stream is up here. as the days get longer it works its way north. the jet stream is not in our area. that mean as warm up. high pressure building in. temperatures 76 in fresno. 60 in monterey. temperatures around the bay, 77 antioch. 75 in santa rosa. these are temperatures. coastal fog returning here as we go into the next 36 hours. the rain, as you know, no rain coming, and we need rain.
countries, mainly cambodia, indonesia, laos, malaysia, and vietnam. we did that happen and the programs with singapore or myanmar or burma. the way we organize our discussion was to have input and two fantastic experts people with perspective. it will result in a good discussion. i do not know about a debate. i think a discussion with points of view is always a good way to suss out some of the policy issues. i will introduce both speakers and then we will start with lieutenant-general chip gregson. chip is assistant secretary of defense for asian-pacific security affairs. before that he served as a cheap operating officer for the united states olympic committee. he knows a little something in terms of hands on experience. he was commanding general of the marine corps in the asia- pacific. over 70,000manage .arines and sailors from 2001-2003 he was commanding general of the marine corps forces in japan. prior to that he was director of asia pacific policy and the a secretary of defense. he was a graduate of the u.s. naval academy and hold a couple of masters degrees. director of the huma
that every man and woman serve the country. vietnam and a respect anyone who served their country in any capacity. in switzerland, you have to serve the country for three years. i think in our hearts, we ought to have an unwritten rule that we have to find some way to give back to america. you are so lucky because you have a host of ways and no one should tell you how to give back. you should follow your heart. clearly there are ways you can impact the world. just sitting at home on a computer, you can change the world, and i encourage you to do so. >> thank you, governor. we will try to get to the questions here on the panel. also when we go to philadelphia, to think about other institutions of public service that we can create. and asked to follow up? for governorho ran or senator did not do that as their first office. they started somewhere else. talk about getting in at the lower level and also what you see in california for people of today who are looking to get into politics, breaking in at a lower level who might then use those as stepping stones to move to higher office. >> my pr
to washington, chicago first and then washington covering the vietnam war be about, oh, early '65. and it was like on the job training for why to learn to hate a war. because going there, not that much, but mostly working in washington as a correspondent for the ap, and the ap has a lot of juice because, you know, every story you write is on every editor's desk theoretically, or could be if it's a good one, in a few minutes around the world. and the other thing was you get to know military guys. and i was saying earlier at dinner -- although i'm very critical of my government, i really am. one thing that you find in the cia and all these agencies and particularly in the military what i, what makes the world work for me anyways as a journalist, you find people that are not loyal to the two-star or the three-star or to the chief of staff of the army or to the president, but you're loyal to the constitution. that's something that's drifting away more and more particularly as you see the erosion of congress in its oversight capacity, the growth of the executive. you all see those thin
the largest helicopter evacuation in history during the final days of the vietnam war they called it separation greecket wind. a plan to get many people out of the south vietnam me capital of saigones trying to catch a ride out of the city. 81 helicopters took more than 1,000 americans and nearly 6,000 refugees to navy ships. out at sea pushed overboard so others could land. the next day north vietnam me tanks burst through the presidential palace gates in saigon. the south surrendered effectively ending the war. the great shuttle to safety got underway 38 years ago today and now you know the news for this monday, april the 29th, 2013 i'm shepard smith. back tomorrow noon pacific, 3:00 eastern time for "studio b" and right back here for "the fox report" tomorrow night. the o'reilly factor is coming up now. have a great one. >> bill: the o'reilly factor is on. tonight: [machine gunfire. [sthvment- >> watch yourself rbg backlash. >> bill: brutal report out today that the cia leader is bribing afghanistan and allies. millions of dollars of cash is being handed to. they brit hume and
in the world for apple. have gone on trial in vietnam, accused of attempted murder during a forced landing fiction by the government. this comes at a time of growing anger against land seizures. >> this is all that is left of his home and fish farming business. it was destroyed in a violent clash last year as police moved in to evict him and his family. it is alleged they used improvised shotguns and homemade knives during the standup. six policemen and soldiers were allegedly injured. >> i hope all the defendants will be tried fairly. we are innocent. they pressed charges of murder against us while no one was killed, and obstructed officials on duty. we just protected our duty. >> you spent almost 20 years and his life savings turning what was once this swampland into a viable fish farm. because of the problems dates back to when local officials began trying to force him off the fish farm without compensation. a maine has become source of dissent against one- party rule. police broke up outcast by supporters gathered outside of the court on tuesday. this is not the first case where excess
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